Cashmere

Cashmere comes from the highlands of China and Mongolia, this precious fiber is obtained by means of a delicate combing procedure, totally harmless to the animal.

During this process about 300 grams of fiber are obtained for each animal, which is why Cashmere is so valuable.

Thanks to its natural structure, Cashmere has extraordinary insulating properties, the air trapped by the fibers creates a barrier that keeps the body heat. The softness, lightness and the ability to maintain heat make Cashmere products perfect for winter, but also for cool summer evenings.

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Camel

The Camel is native of North America, it is the result of a very long evolution. About 4-5 million years ago it migrated to Asia through the Bering Strait and gave rise to the two-humped, long-haired species that spread throughout Central Asia. A peculiarity of this type of wool is that it is not obtained by shearing, but collected by hand during the moult or by combing the animal with special iron combs, the process is totally painless. Camel is a wool that maintains its extraordinary natural qualities unaltered even in color. The yarn has the appearance of a golden tan with shades ranging from red to light brown, there is no need for dyes and the beauty of these fabrics lies in the characteristic color. Camel wool is also very warm and breathable.

 

 Wool

In Australia, sheep breeding and the shearing of wool have been considered a primary industry since the 1800s, currently it is considered a true state of  art. The main property of wool is heat insulation, in fact it insulates not only from the cold but also from the heat. Wool also has a high hygroscopicity, meaning it has the ability to absorb sweat and moisture well together with a good water repellency. This fiber, in addition to having a very high flash point, avoids bacterial proliferation, consequently it resists bad odors well. Wool is a delicate fiber that tends to become felted, which is why it should not be washed at high temperatures.

 

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Mohair

Mohair is a fine textile fiber obtained from the hair of the Angora goat. The name angora comes from Ankara, the capital of Turkey, where the breeding of these animals has been present for over 2,000 years. The term Mohair also derives from the Arab world. Mohair wool is characterized by some excellent properties, compared to other types of wool, it has greater uniformity of the fibers, absence of impurities and an extraordinary shine. Its resilience and lightness qualities offer warmth without being too heavy. Like all long-haired wools, while wearing there can be a loss of excess hair, which should not be considered a defect, but a characteristic of the fiber.